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Fake News: Fake news in History

Yellow Journalism

 

A term for a type of journalism that presents little or no legitimate well-researched news and instead uses eye-catching headlines to sell more newspapers. Techniques may include exaggerations of news events, scandal-mongering or sensationalism.

The term was coined in the mid-1890s to characterize the sensational journalism that used some yellow ink in the circulation war between Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. The battle peaked from 1895 to about 1898, and historical usage often refers specifically to this period. Both papers were accused by critics of sensationalizing the news in order to drive up circulation, although the newspapers did serious reporting as well.

"War of the Worlds" Radio Broadcast October 30, 1938

The War of the Worlds is an episode of the American radio drama anthology series The Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was performed as a Halloween episode of the series on Sunday, October 30, 1938, and aired over the Columbia Broadcasting System radio network. Directed and narrated by actor and future filmmaker Orson Welles, the episode was an adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds (1898). It became famous for allegedly causing mass panic, although the scale of the panic is disputed as the program had relatively few listeners

Dewey Defeats Truman

On November 3, 1948, the day after the U.S. presidential election, the front-page headline of the Chicago Tribune proclaimed: “Dewey Defeats Truman.” In fact, the newspaper got the story all wrong, because President Harry Truman ended up scoring a surprise victory over his opponent, Governor Thomas Dewey of New York.