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Fake News: Activity

This guide will provide students and faculty with tips on how to avoid fake news and how to find credible sources.

Where do you get your news from?

Which of the following activities, if any, did you do yesterday?

Got news from family

Yes….No

Got news from a teacher or other adult in my life

Yes….No

Got news from a website or app

Yes….No

Watched news on television

Yes….No

Listened to news on the radio

Yes….No

Read any newspapers in print

Yes….No

 

How often do you do each of the following?

Read any newspapers in print

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Listen to news on the radio

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Watch news on television

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Get news from a social-networking site

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Get news from a website or app

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Get news from friends

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Get news from family

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

Get news from a teacher or other adult in my life

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

 

When you are online and come across information in a news story that you think is wrong, how often do you try to figure out whether or not it is true?

Often….Sometimes….Hardly ever….Never

In the past six months, have you shared a news story online that you later found out was wrong or inaccurate?

Yes….No….Unsure

Questions from:

Caldwell, Jennifer, and John H.N. Fisher.  “News and American’s Kids:  How Young People Perceive and Are Impacted by the News.”  Common Sense Media, https://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/news-and-americas-kids.  Accessed 13 March 2017, https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/03/this-article-wont-change-your-mind/519093/.  Accessed 15 Mar. 2017.

Discussion Questions

Discussion:

What are potential consequences when fake news goes ‘viral’?

What does the phrase “fake news” mean? How should we define “fake news”?

Why does it matter if we can’t tell real news from fake news?

Further discussion:

Does satirical news count as “fake news”?

How does bias fit in?

What is “real news”?

A news continuum?

How can we avoid fake news? How can we fact check?

Fake News Activity

Let's compare two websites:

1. Eat This, Not That!

2. Farmed vs. Wild Salmon

Which one do you think is true? Why or Why Not?

From the question above, how do you know which site is credible? Name 3 characteristics of the sites that make it a credible site. 

1.

2.

3.